In Pictures: Yugo-Nostalgists Mark Tito Anniversary

Bos/Hrv/SrpShqipМакедонски

News
04 May 15
In Pictures: Yugo-Nostalgists Mark Tito Anniversary

Admirers of former Yugoslav leader Josip Broz Tito commemorated the 35th anniversary of his death at events in various countries across the Balkans.

RTS, Beta, BIRN
Belgrade

Admirers of former Yugoslav leader Josip Broz Tito commemorated the 35th anniversary of his death at events in various countries across the Balkans. | Photo by Beta

Hundreds of people gathered at the Belgrade mausoleum known as the House of Flowers on Monday to pay their respects to Yugoslavia’s late president, Josip Broz Tito, who died on May 4, 1980.

Tito’s admirers are mainly elderly people who visit his mausoleum every year to lay flowers in tribute to their beloved leader.

“We enjoyed a reputation with him, we had all the rights, health insurance, education, we built up the country, we would hang out with a guitar, singing, in contrast to today’s youth, who have no prospects,” Belgrader Marina Jovanovic told Serbian public broadcaster RTS.

Like others who came to commemorate Tito, Sevala Begetic from the Bosnian town of Tuzla, also believes that people lived much better under his rule than they do today.

“While there was Tito, people could travel where they wanted and do what they wanted, and they had as much as they wanted,” Begetic told RTS.

In Sarajevo, the Josip Broz Tito association led a wreath-laying ceremony at Tito’s monument on the Sarajevo University campus at 3.03pm, the time at which Tito died in a hospital in Slovenia 35 years ago.

To mark the occasion, the Kezman family from Bosnia published a eulogy for Tito in Sarajevo-based daily newspaper Oslobodjenje.

“Let them not to explain our time with you, we lived and enjoyed those years. Let them not to explain our time without you, we live and hardly survive that time,” it says.

Veteran members of his Partisan wartime resistance movement and Communists in Montenegro also called for the construction of a Tito monument in the capital Podgorica, the city that once bore the name of the late Yugoslav president.

From 1946 until the collapse of socialist Yugoslavia in 1992, Podgorica was called Titograd. One boulevard in the city is still named after him.

Tito ruled Yugoslavia from its formation in 1945 to his death in 1980, after leading the Partisans during the World War II.

Because of his non-aligned diplomatic stance, Tito was admired by many in the West as a benign dictator, and was praised for maintaining peaceful coexistence between the peoples of Yugoslavia.

He was the only successful defector from the Soviet bloc, which he quit in 1948 in order pursue a neutral foreign policy during the Cold War. The country fell apart just over ten years after his death in 1980.

More then 200 state delegations attended his funeral in Belgrade, including four kings, 31 presidents, six princes, 22 prime ministers and 47 ministers of foreign affairs.

Tito’s burial brought together politicians from both sides of Iron Curtain, such as UK Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and the president of the Soviet Union Leonid Brezhnev.


A supporter of the late Yugoslav communist president Josip Broz Tito carries the old Yugoslav flag with the communist five-pointed star in front of his memorial complex, in Belgrade, Serbia. | Photo by Darko Vojinovic/AP


People from various parts of the former Yugoslavia flocked to Tito’s grave to mark the 35th anniversary of his death. | Photo by Beta


Photo by Beta

Photo by Beta

Photo by Beta

Supporters of former Yugoslav President Josip Broz Tito in front of his memorial complex in Belgrade. | Photo by Darko Vojinovic/AP


A supporter of late Yugoslav communist president Josip Broz Tito, wearing a World War II guerrilla cap waits in front of his memorial complex in Belgrade. | Photo by Darko Vojinovic/AP


Josip Joska Broz, Tito’s grandson, with family. | Photo by Beta


Souvenirs in front of the House of Flowers. | Photo by Beta

Source: Balkan Insight (Montenegro)